Progress in Inorganic Chemistry, Volume 8 by ed. F. Albert Cotton

By ed. F. Albert Cotton

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S. 26 nim sec-1) is very much larger than in the remaining nonhalogenated compounds, 36 R. H. 70 mm sec-l) is toinp:ir:hlt: to tlint observed in other organoirori tin compoiirids and mucbh smaller than that experted for Sn(I1). These observations arc most probably d a t e d to the ring struc*t,ureof this tompound arid the steric requirerncrits imposed thereby; more specifically that thc bonding is not adequately described in terms of sp3 hybridization. Further examples of such cyclic structures deserve study to elucidate this point-and its relationship to the question of involvement of higher tin atom orbitals in the bonding-in greater detail.

IV. Host Structiires. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A. The Host Lattice and The Clathration \'aids. . . . . . . . 1. Vertex Linking in Three Ilimensions . . . . . . . . . . 2. Face Sharing in Two Dimemioris with Vertex Linking in t,heThird . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 . Face Sharing in Three Dimensions. . . . . . . . . . . 4. ween t,he Groups.

1:efereiic:es. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 30 . 2i 58 38 66 67 70 71 74 76 80 87 ox 99 I. Introduction A clathratc hydrat is a crystalline compound which can kw obtained by the formation of a hydrogen-bonded water “host” lattice around one or more species of “guest” molecules or ions. The interaction leading l o crystallizatiori of the hydrate is primarily a physical enclosure, on the atomic scale, of the guest species by the host.

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