Chemical Hardness by Sen K.D.

By Sen K.D.

Show description

Read Online or Download Chemical Hardness PDF

Similar inorganic books

Spectroscopic Properties of Inorganic and Organometallic Compounds: v. 6: A Review of Chemical Literature (Specialist Periodical Reports)

Spectroscopic houses of Inorganic and Organometallic Compounds presents a special resource of data on a tremendous sector of chemistry. Divided into sections as a rule in response to the actual spectroscopic approach used, assurance in every one quantity comprises: NMR (with connection with stereochemistry, dynamic platforms, paramagnetic complexes, stable country NMR and teams 13-18); nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy; vibrational spectroscopy of major workforce and transition point compounds and coordinated ligands; and electron diffraction.

Industrial Chemistry: New Applications, Processes and Systems

This assortment provides to the reader a wide spectrum of chapters within the a number of branches of commercial chemistry, which reveal key advancements in those swiftly altering fields.

Ionisation Constants of Inorganic Acids and Bases in Aqueous Solution

Ionisation Constants of Inorganic Acids and Bases in Aqueous resolution, moment version presents a compilation of tables that summarize appropriate information recorded within the literature as much as the tip of 1980 for the ionization constants of inorganic acids and bases in aqueous resolution. This booklet comprises references to acidity services for powerful acids and bases, in addition to information about the formation of polynuclear species.

Extra info for Chemical Hardness

Sample text

51)) they evolve as a whole towards an equilibrium state AB of 38 Jos6 L. G~izqucz maximum hardness. This result agrees with experimental evidence: soft molecules are more reactive than hard molecules [5, 7, 8]. 6 The Principle o f Hard and Soft Acids and Bases Starting from the analysis presented in the previous section we will now try to understand why "hard likes hard", and "soft likes soft" (HSAB principle) [1, 34]. In this case it is convenient to express Eqs. (49) and (51) in terms of the initial values of the parameters, rather than in terms of the final values of the parameters.

1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 2 Fundamental Equations for the Energy Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 3 Local Hardness and Global Hardness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 4 Chemical Potential, Hardness, Ionization Potential, and Electron Affinity . . . . . . 33 5 The Interaction Energy and the Principle of Maximum Hardness . . . . . . . . . Acids and Bases .

49)) A and B evolve to become as soft as possible, while in the second step (Eq. (51)) they evolve as a whole towards an equilibrium state AB of 38 Jos6 L. G~izqucz maximum hardness. This result agrees with experimental evidence: soft molecules are more reactive than hard molecules [5, 7, 8]. 6 The Principle o f Hard and Soft Acids and Bases Starting from the analysis presented in the previous section we will now try to understand why "hard likes hard", and "soft likes soft" (HSAB principle) [1, 34].

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.49 of 5 – based on 40 votes